Roberto Santaguida


Friday September 29, 2017  to Saturday November 4, 2017
Arnica Artist Run Centre



Roberto Santaguida, the creator of the film installation Melodies for Solo Voices, is a documentary filmmaker, who employs an avant-garde filmmaking practice that experiments with the space of the gallery. Reflecting a transitional and highly experimental period in the artist’s work, Melodies for Solo Voices is a multi-perspective documentary that follows a group of professional singers as they individually prepare for a multilingual performance of Der Turm zu Babel. There is no conventional plot structure; instead the film leads in and out of the personal lives of the performers. In doing so, the film becomes an alternative kind of group portrait, one that shifts between the solitary focus of the individual rehearsals and orchestration of those solo voices through the filmic structure itself. Santaguida has an MFA from NSCAD University and currently works in Berlin.


Location Information: Arnica Artist Run Centre

Click for more information and events for Arnica Artist Run Centre

City Centre
Arnica Artist Run Centre

7 West Seymour Street,
Kamloops, BC,
Canada

nvironment for emerging contemporary artists. Arnica received charitable status in 2008 and is part of a Canada-wide network of artist run centres.

Arnica provides exhibition space for contemporary art that is dynamic, innovative and thoughtful. It also serves as a space for artists to research and develop new work and helps emerging artists in our city, adding to the cultural mix of Kamloops.

Artist Run Centres (ARCs) emerged in the early 1970’s in several Canadian cities.

These venues developed as a response to a lack of appropriate exhibition spaces for artists whose priorities were non-commercial, and were considered too early in their careers to exhibit in institutional or public galleries.

ARCs are not-for-profit societies and are often charitable organizations. They are typically managed by one or more staff and have a Board of Directors comprised mainly of practicing artists. Those ARCs that formed in the 1970’s have access to an operating grant from Canada Council specific to Artist Run Centres. However, this grant is finite, so ARCs that formed in the 1990’s or later survive through application to project grant after project grant.

The underlying premise of Artist-Run Centres is that artists are given creative control of their work rather than being constrained by the demands of the commercial market. Therefore, the work tends to be more experimental and diverse.

Visitors often find the work they encounter in ARCs to be outside the conventional definitions of what art can and should be.